Our guide to Yarmouth holiday cottages

The ferry from Lymington brings you into the town of Yarmouth. Yarmouth is a very small town consisting of a pretty town square, castle and pier. In fact, the wooden pier is the last remaining wooden pier in the UK. The pier is 609 feet long and offers superb sea fishing. There is a small fee to enter the pier which goes towards its upkeep. One of the lovely features of the pier is that each wooden plank has been sponsored and the name of the sponsor is engraved into the plank.

Things to do in Yarmouth

At the heart of Yarmouth is the small town square where you will find a pleasing range of independent shops. For a lovely cup of coffee and a slice of amazing cake then you should pop into PO41 coffee shop in Quay Street. It’s a small cafe but the coffee is delicious and the cakes are splendid, plus they have free wi-fi.

Alternatively just across the square is The Bugle Coaching Inn. If you are very hungry, you could try The Bugle Burger which is an amazing tower of food served with chips and salad. Eat inside in one of the cosy niches or take advantage of one of the two garden areas instead. As with many other pubs on the island, the Bugle is dog friendly. Parking is available in their very small car park or in the Pier square just outside.

Just outside of the actual town is Fort Victoria Country Park on Westhill Lane. Drive right to the end of the lane and you arrive at a nice big flat car park surrounded on two sides by the remains of the Old Victorian fort. Among the attractions housed within the battlements are the Island Planetarium and Fort Victoria model railway. The Island Planetarium is usually open in the evenings for star gazing, as the Isle of Wight has such low light pollution it’s a great place for learning about the stars. If the weather is less than sunny then the model railway is a great place to while away a few hours. They have some amazingly detailed displays, some of which are running all the time and others that have to be button started. Within the displays are working models of a fairground, a circus and a miniature model railway too.

Places to visit in Yarmouth

Just outside Yarmouth is the charming village of Wellow and here you will find a surprise you may not have expected on the Isle of Wight. This is the home of West Wight Alpacas and Llamas. Situated in 23 acres of beautiful countryside, the animals include miniature donkeys, pygmy goats and rheas to name but a few. The farm walks are either twenty or forty minutes long with the longer having the option of a picnic at its end. If you would prefer to venture further afield then there are the two or four hour walks where alpacas or llamas go with you. At the end of your trek you can reward yourself with a visit to the on-site Llama tree cafe and bistro or wander around the gift shop selling a range of garments made from the alpaca wools.

On the Newport Road leading out of Yarmouth you come across Tapnell Farm. Not your usual farm though. Tapnell is home of the wallabies and meerkats who thrive here. The farm is a huge area of fun and enjoyment. If you want the children to burn off some energy then this is the place for you. There are daily activities where you can feed or handle some of the animals, or go into the Play Barn - a three storey soft-play area where the activities are decorated with an animal theme. There are slides, ball-pits, climbing walls, ride on toys (including tractors) and a toddlers area for the very small ones. Outside is the bouncy pillow, a cross between a trampoline and an inflatable air cushion. For the hardier child there is the straw bale adventure barn with its zip wires and karting.

On the Rocks

How about this then…you order your steak and then cook it yourself on a slab of sizzling volcanic rock – just the way you like it. That’s the experience at On the Rocks in Yarmouth, and it’s great fun. The Black Rock Grill Experience is the only one of its kind on the whole of the island, and the unique...

Yarmouth Castle

Owned by the English Heritage, Yarmouth Castle was the last coastal defence built by the tyrannical Henry VIII, and it wasn’t finished until after he died in 1547. These days, the castle is used by visitors as a picturesque picnic spot, thanks to its elevated views across the shimmering Solent, and it’s a fun day out by the sea. The...
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