The History of Lynton & Lynmouth

The History of Lynton & Lynmouth

Description

Lynton and Lynmouth history has it all. From natural disasters tinged with conspiracy theories, to famous fiction and legend, and one of Britain’s most unusual forms of transport! Guests of holiday cottages in Lynton and Lynmouth are greeted by history at every turn, and whichever aspect interests you most you’ll have plenty of opportunity to explore it.

The Lynmouth Flood

Tragedy struck the village of Lynmouth in 1952, when a flood devastated the village and took the lives of 34 people. August of 1952 saw the worst flood in Britain for years gush through Lynmouth when the village saw 9 inches of rain in a 24 hour period.

A wall of water surged through Lynmouth from Exmoor as a result of the downpour, uprooting trees, killing 34 and collapsing 39 buildings. The army were called in to help handle the disaster and cleanup operation, and questions about the flood still continue today. One of the strongest theories is that the rain was caused by an experiment to create artificial rain, and evidence has been discovered by the BBC supporting this in recent years.

Lynmouth Power Station

Not to be overlooked, Lynmouth Power Station Lynmouth Power Station opened in 1890, securing the village’s place in the history of electricity. Once it was discovered that water power was more economical for electricity than the alternatives such as gas, Devon came into its own.

With its fast flowing rivers and many streams, the Lynmouth Power Station opened in 1890.

One of the main reasons for the proposal’s support when suggested by Charles Green was that it was felt that electric lighting would give Lynmouth an advantage over rival tourist towns.

Overland Launch Overnight

The night of January 12 1899 saw one of the most fascinating events in North Devon’s lifeboat history. When a vessel got into trouble off Porlock during a bad storm, it was obvious that the lifeboat, the Louisa in Mynmouth, could not be launched from Lynmouth and would need to be launched from Porlock.

Rather than give up and leave the Forrest Hall to the fates, local residents dragged the 13.5 miles of hilly terrain to Porlock Weir throughout the stormy night, where it was launched in the morning to rescue the ship. The youngest member of the crew who performed this mammoth rescue was 15 years old.

Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway

The most unavoidable piece of Lynton and Lynmouth history is its history cliff railway. The Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway has connected the communities of Lynton and Lynmouth since 1890, and was once a crucial mode of transport. The workings of this water-powered lift continue to fascinate visitors to the attraction, as the passenger cars are only powered by water and do not create any emissions.

The cliff railway becase a tourist attraction during Victorian times, and no doubt played a part in the area being nicknames ‘Little Switzerland!’. Although the passengers of the cliff railway have changed over the years, the breathtaking views from the cars have not – they act as one of the best vantage points for coastal views in North Devon!

Lorna Doone

Lynton and Lynmouth occupy the very heart of Lorna Doone Country, and the famous novel was set in the area – fuelling the romantic legends and tales the area’s countryside inspires. R.D Blackmore set his novel in the village of Oare, just 5 miles away from Lynton, and many still head to the area’s church and surrounding trails to walk the fictional footsteps of the characters.

It’s said that the story of the Doone family was inspired by Exmoor life at the time, relayed to the author by his uncle – a rector in Oare church at the time. Exmoor’s wild moorland was certainly a harsh place to live, and the threats of smugglers and outlaws were a very real part of life. Were the Doones real? You decide!

Lynton and Lynmouth history has it all. From natural disasters tinged with conspiracy theories, to famous fiction and legend, and one of Britain’s most unusual forms of transport! Guests of holiday cottages in Lynton and Lynmouth are greeted by history at every turn, and whichever aspect interests you most you’ll have plenty of opportunity to explore it.

The Lynmouth Flood

Tragedy struck the village of Lynmouth in 1952, when a flood devastated the village and took the lives of 34 people. August of 1952 saw the worst flood in Britain for years gush through Lynmouth when the village saw 9 inches of rain in a 24 hour period.

A wall of water surged through Lynmouth from Exmoor as a result of the downpour, uprooting trees, killing 34 and collapsing 39 buildings. The army were called in to help handle the disaster and cleanup operation, and questions about the flood still continue today. One of the strongest theories is that the rain was caused by an experiment to create artificial rain, and evidence has been discovered by the BBC supporting this in recent years.

Lynmouth Power Station

Not to be overlooked, Lynmouth Power Station Lynmouth Power Station opened in 1890, securing the village’s place in the history of electricity. Once it was discovered that water power was more economical for electricity than the alternatives such as gas, Devon came into its own.

With its fast flowing rivers and many streams, the Lynmouth Power Station opened in 1890.

One of the main reasons for the proposal’s support when suggested by Charles Green was that it was felt that electric lighting would give Lynmouth an advantage over rival tourist towns.

Overland Launch Overnight

The night of January 12 1899 saw one of the most fascinating events in North Devon’s lifeboat history. When a vessel got into trouble off Porlock during a bad storm, it was obvious that the lifeboat, the Louisa in Mynmouth, could not be launched from Lynmouth and would need to be launched from Porlock.

Rather than give up and leave the Forrest Hall to the fates, local residents dragged the 13.5 miles of hilly terrain to Porlock Weir throughout the stormy night, where it was launched in the morning to rescue the ship. The youngest member of the crew who performed this mammoth rescue was 15 years old.

Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway

The most unavoidable piece of Lynton and Lynmouth history is its history cliff railway. The Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway has connected the communities of Lynton and Lynmouth since 1890, and was once a crucial mode of transport. The workings of this water-powered lift continue to fascinate visitors to the attraction, as the passenger cars are only powered by water and do not create any emissions.

The cliff railway becase a tourist attraction during Victorian times, and no doubt played a part in the area being nicknames ‘Little Switzerland!’. Although the passengers of the cliff railway have changed over the years, the breathtaking views from the cars have not – they act as one of the best vantage points for coastal views in North Devon!

Lorna Doone

Lynton and Lynmouth occupy the very heart of Lorna Doone Country, and the famous novel was set in the area – fuelling the romantic legends and tales the area’s countryside inspires. R.D Blackmore set his novel in the village of Oare, just 5 miles away from Lynton, and many still head to the area’s church and surrounding trails to walk the fictional footsteps of the characters.

It’s said that the story of the Doone family was inspired by Exmoor life at the time, relayed to the author by his uncle – a rector in Oare church at the time. Exmoor’s wild moorland was certainly a harsh place to live, and the threats of smugglers and outlaws were a very real part of life. Were the Doones real? You decide!

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