St Ives History

St Ives History

Description

St Ives holiday cottages are favourites with artists and the creative, so it stands to reason that the resort boasts a colourful and interesting history! The St Ives history books include kind traditions to remember former residents, saints and the industry helped by its harbour...enjoying exploring it!

St Ives Harbour

As is the case with many seaside towns, the development of its harbour saw industry in St Ives boom.

St Ives had always been a bustling fishing port, even as far back as the Middle Ages, and the town even had a shipping company to its name - The Hain Line.

The company started in 1878 and was headquartered in the town, and the local tin industry created even more shipping business for St Ives. In 1830, the harbour’s status was recognised when it was listed as an important harbour.

St James' Day

St James’ Day is held every 5 years, and its origins are rooted in a unique chapter of St Ives history. In 1782, John Knill, a local Customs Officer built himself a mausoleum on Worvas Hill – as he objected to being buried in a churchyard. Unfortunately, there were obstacles with the consecration of the mausoleum, and when he died in 1811 John was buried in a church in Holborn.

As John wanted to be remembered by the residents of St Ives, they dance around the mausoleum during St James’ Day, a tradition that has taken place for nearly 200 years.

St la

The history of St Ives starts with St la, an Irish princess responsible for the introduction of Christianity to the town during the 5 century. According to the legend, St la was to leave Ireland for Cornwall with many other saints, but they left without her. Terrified by the prospect of making the journey alone, the young saint said a prayer.

Before long, a leaf appeared on the waves in front of her, steadily growing larger while St la watched. Trusting God, she climbed onto it and made the journey across the sea with ease, arriving in St Ives. The Church of St la still looks over the town today.

As I Was Going to St Ives

How many were going to St Ives?

The traditional nursery rhyme 'As I Was Going to St Ives' is as as much a piece of the country’s history as St Ives history, and the earliest recording of it dates al the way back to the year 1730.

Although there were several St Ives in England at the time, it’s widely believed to refer to Cornwall’s. See if you can work out the riddle!

The Hurling of the Silver Ball

As well as St Ives’ best-loved events, the Hurling of the Silver Ball is also one of its oldest customs. The game’s origins can be traced back for more than 1000 years, and the event is a vital part of the annual St Ives Feast.

The Hurling of the Silver Ball sees teams from neighbouring parishes compete to hold on to a silver ball around the size of a cricket ball. The event sees plenty of good natured rivalry, as those taking part scramble for the ball in the streets of St Ives!

St Ives holiday cottages are favourites with artists and the creative, so it stands to reason that the resort boasts a colourful and interesting history! The St Ives history books include kind traditions to remember former residents, saints and the industry helped by its harbour...enjoying exploring it!

St Ives Harbour

As is the case with many seaside towns, the development of its harbour saw industry in St Ives boom.

St Ives had always been a bustling fishing port, even as far back as the Middle Ages, and the town even had a shipping company to its name - The Hain Line.

The company started in 1878 and was headquartered in the town, and the local tin industry created even more shipping business for St Ives. In 1830, the harbour’s status was recognised when it was listed as an important harbour.

St James' Day

St James’ Day is held every 5 years, and its origins are rooted in a unique chapter of St Ives history. In 1782, John Knill, a local Customs Officer built himself a mausoleum on Worvas Hill – as he objected to being buried in a churchyard. Unfortunately, there were obstacles with the consecration of the mausoleum, and when he died in 1811 John was buried in a church in Holborn.

As John wanted to be remembered by the residents of St Ives, they dance around the mausoleum during St James’ Day, a tradition that has taken place for nearly 200 years.

St la

The history of St Ives starts with St la, an Irish princess responsible for the introduction of Christianity to the town during the 5 century. According to the legend, St la was to leave Ireland for Cornwall with many other saints, but they left without her. Terrified by the prospect of making the journey alone, the young saint said a prayer.

Before long, a leaf appeared on the waves in front of her, steadily growing larger while St la watched. Trusting God, she climbed onto it and made the journey across the sea with ease, arriving in St Ives. The Church of St la still looks over the town today.

As I Was Going to St Ives

How many were going to St Ives?

The traditional nursery rhyme 'As I Was Going to St Ives' is as as much a piece of the country’s history as St Ives history, and the earliest recording of it dates al the way back to the year 1730.

Although there were several St Ives in England at the time, it’s widely believed to refer to Cornwall’s. See if you can work out the riddle!

The Hurling of the Silver Ball

As well as St Ives’ best-loved events, the Hurling of the Silver Ball is also one of its oldest customs. The game’s origins can be traced back for more than 1000 years, and the event is a vital part of the annual St Ives Feast.

The Hurling of the Silver Ball sees teams from neighbouring parishes compete to hold on to a silver ball around the size of a cricket ball. The event sees plenty of good natured rivalry, as those taking part scramble for the ball in the streets of St Ives!

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