St Austell History

St Austell History

Description

The history of St Austell and Eden is entwined with some inspiring human stories too, and if you explore the heritage of the area during a stay in a St Austell holiday cottage you’ll be touched and awed by a past that’s still visible all around.

The Eden Project

Although not the oldest chapter of St Austell history, The Eden Project is certainly an important one. The Eden Project was built on the site of a disused china clay quarry which dates back 160 years, and started out as one of many Landmark Millennium Projects to mark the year 2000.

Tim Smit, who was working on the Lost Gardens of Heligan at the time, formed a team of experienced horticulturalists to work on the project and so it started. The attraction opened to the public in March 2001, and fascinates millions each year with its enormous biomes and many species of plant.

St Austell Brewery

The St Austell Brewery is a working Victorian brewery with its feet firmly in the history of St Austell. It all started in 1851, when Walter Hicks, a wine and spirit merchant, set up his own business and began supplying malt to local ale houses.

By 1863, Hicks had bought the Seven Stars Inn in St Austell, where he began brewing, and by 1869 he built his own steam brewery in the town centre. His vision of a successful brewery in the West Country was beginning to take shape. The brewery you can visit today on Trevarthian Road opened in 189, so you can still roam the scene of this slice of St Austell history with a tour!

China Clay

Although mush of St Austell’s history is fascinating, it was a chance discovery that made the town famous in the middle of the 18 century! William Cookworthy, a chemist, found huge amounts of Kaolin (china clay) deposited throughout the area. Since this mineral has always been used in industries such as paper, porcelain, pharmaceuticals and many more, this was a significant find.

The extraction of the area’s china clay soon became its dominant industry, leading to the huge growth of St Austell, and the China Clay Museum is now open to the public on the site of an exhausted china clay mine.

The Lost Gardens of Heligan

The Lost Gardens of Heligan have their own place in the history of St Austell, and the heritage of those who have worked in them over the centuries. The gardens surround Heligan, the imposing family seat of the Cornish Tremayne family, and were a beautiful sight at the start of the 19 century. Sadly, their workers were called to help in the Great War efforts, but they left a touching inscription with their signatures beneath on a wall in the grounds.

The gardens were forgotten for many years, and grew unchecked until an ancestor of the Tremaynes found the note in 1990 and decided to restore them to their former glory. The spectacular grounds and gardens you can see today are the results of years of his hard work and efforts.

The history of St Austell and Eden is entwined with some inspiring human stories too, and if you explore the heritage of the area during a stay in a St Austell holiday cottage you’ll be touched and awed by a past that’s still visible all around.

The Eden Project

Although not the oldest chapter of St Austell history, The Eden Project is certainly an important one. The Eden Project was built on the site of a disused china clay quarry which dates back 160 years, and started out as one of many Landmark Millennium Projects to mark the year 2000.

Tim Smit, who was working on the Lost Gardens of Heligan at the time, formed a team of experienced horticulturalists to work on the project and so it started. The attraction opened to the public in March 2001, and fascinates millions each year with its enormous biomes and many species of plant.

St Austell Brewery

The St Austell Brewery is a working Victorian brewery with its feet firmly in the history of St Austell. It all started in 1851, when Walter Hicks, a wine and spirit merchant, set up his own business and began supplying malt to local ale houses.

By 1863, Hicks had bought the Seven Stars Inn in St Austell, where he began brewing, and by 1869 he built his own steam brewery in the town centre. His vision of a successful brewery in the West Country was beginning to take shape. The brewery you can visit today on Trevarthian Road opened in 189, so you can still roam the scene of this slice of St Austell history with a tour!

China Clay

Although mush of St Austell’s history is fascinating, it was a chance discovery that made the town famous in the middle of the 18 century! William Cookworthy, a chemist, found huge amounts of Kaolin (china clay) deposited throughout the area. Since this mineral has always been used in industries such as paper, porcelain, pharmaceuticals and many more, this was a significant find.

The extraction of the area’s china clay soon became its dominant industry, leading to the huge growth of St Austell, and the China Clay Museum is now open to the public on the site of an exhausted china clay mine.

The Lost Gardens of Heligan

The Lost Gardens of Heligan have their own place in the history of St Austell, and the heritage of those who have worked in them over the centuries. The gardens surround Heligan, the imposing family seat of the Cornish Tremayne family, and were a beautiful sight at the start of the 19 century. Sadly, their workers were called to help in the Great War efforts, but they left a touching inscription with their signatures beneath on a wall in the grounds.

The gardens were forgotten for many years, and grew unchecked until an ancestor of the Tremaynes found the note in 1990 and decided to restore them to their former glory. The spectacular grounds and gardens you can see today are the results of years of his hard work and efforts.

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