Mevagissey History

Mevagissey History

Description

There is plenty of fascinating Mevagissey history to be discovered during a stay in one of our Mevagissey holiday cottages, and there’s a story in there for everyone. From the nearby gardens, to a disastrous blizzard, the history of Mevagissey is full of surprises.

Mevagissey Museum

If you want to get a deeper insight into the history of Mevagissey, the Mevagissey Museum houses it. Although the earliest recorded mention of the town was in 1313, there is evidence within the museum to suggest that it existed long before.

Bronze Age artefacts within the museum include arrows, rubbing stone and axe heads...from long before the days when the town relied on local fish to survive. The museum is housed in an 18 century building once used to build and fix smuggling vessels, so even the building is entwined with the rich Mevagissey history!

The Wheelhouse

The Wheelhouse Restaurant holds some unique anecdotes from Mevagissey history, and the best thing is you can still eat in the original restaurant today. The restaurant dates back to 1826, and its interiors are adorned with pictures showing the gradual changes as time’s gone by.

The late Queen Mother paid a visit to the restaurant in 1967, and it’s claimed that John Wesley gave his first ever sermon in the town within the restaurant too! In those days the building was used as a Net Loft, although pews from the old Wesleyan Chapel still sit downstairs in The Wheelhouse.

Great Blizzard 1891

The Great Blizzard that struck in 1891 wreaked destruction across the South West, and Mevagissey didn’t escape its clutches. The town’s harbour walls were finally constructed in 1888, only to be completely destroyed by the gales.

The Great Blizzard swept across the south of England, bringing strong gales and heavy snowfall, and it remains one of the worst of the last century.

Temperatures plummeted well below zero, and some places saw snow of 15 feet! And we shouldn’t forget that in those days such severe weather truly cut communities like Mevagissey off.

Caerhays Castle

Just outside of Mevagissey, Caerhays Castle is a spectacular sight as it overlooks the Cornish coast from its position above Porthluney Cove. The castle is still home to the Williams Family, but the parkland and woodland gardens are open to the public during Spring, when they peak.

The gardens were largely the work of plant hunters in China at the beginning of the 20 century, and over the years these exotic additions led to specialist hybridisation that makes for a unique garden today. The castle is open to the public occasionally, but it’s best to check the opening times before visiting.

 

There is plenty of fascinating Mevagissey history to be discovered during a stay in one of our Mevagissey holiday cottages, and there’s a story in there for everyone. From the nearby gardens, to a disastrous blizzard, the history of Mevagissey is full of surprises.

Mevagissey Museum

If you want to get a deeper insight into the history of Mevagissey, the Mevagissey Museum houses it. Although the earliest recorded mention of the town was in 1313, there is evidence within the museum to suggest that it existed long before.

Bronze Age artefacts within the museum include arrows, rubbing stone and axe heads...from long before the days when the town relied on local fish to survive. The museum is housed in an 18 century building once used to build and fix smuggling vessels, so even the building is entwined with the rich Mevagissey history!

The Wheelhouse

The Wheelhouse Restaurant holds some unique anecdotes from Mevagissey history, and the best thing is you can still eat in the original restaurant today. The restaurant dates back to 1826, and its interiors are adorned with pictures showing the gradual changes as time’s gone by.

The late Queen Mother paid a visit to the restaurant in 1967, and it’s claimed that John Wesley gave his first ever sermon in the town within the restaurant too! In those days the building was used as a Net Loft, although pews from the old Wesleyan Chapel still sit downstairs in The Wheelhouse.

Great Blizzard 1891

The Great Blizzard that struck in 1891 wreaked destruction across the South West, and Mevagissey didn’t escape its clutches. The town’s harbour walls were finally constructed in 1888, only to be completely destroyed by the gales.

The Great Blizzard swept across the south of England, bringing strong gales and heavy snowfall, and it remains one of the worst of the last century.

Temperatures plummeted well below zero, and some places saw snow of 15 feet! And we shouldn’t forget that in those days such severe weather truly cut communities like Mevagissey off.

Caerhays Castle

Just outside of Mevagissey, Caerhays Castle is a spectacular sight as it overlooks the Cornish coast from its position above Porthluney Cove. The castle is still home to the Williams Family, but the parkland and woodland gardens are open to the public during Spring, when they peak.

The gardens were largely the work of plant hunters in China at the beginning of the 20 century, and over the years these exotic additions led to specialist hybridisation that makes for a unique garden today. The castle is open to the public occasionally, but it’s best to check the opening times before visiting.

 

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