Kingsand & Cawsand History

Kingsand & Cawsand History

Description

Tucked in ‘Cornwall’s forgotten corner’, the whitewashed fishing villages of Kingsand and Cawsand lie on the peaceful Rame Peninsula. In spite of their picturesque whitewashed cottages and sloping streets the twin villages are home to some surprising historical secrets! Kingsand and Cawsand holiday cottages are surrounded by history, so have fun stepping into it...

The Ancient Border

Kingsand and Cawsand may look tranquil and unassuming, but Kingsand and Cawsand’s history is actually entwined with two counties! Kingsand was in Devon until 1844, and the Cornwall and Devon border ran right between the two villages.

The ancient border has since been officially moved, but if you look closely you can still find the original painted sign on the border cottage, a house named Devon Corn. How many chances do you get to stand in what was once Cornwall and Devon at the same time?!

John Pollarn RN

A former resident also made the Kingsand and Cawsand history books, John Pollard RN made his name as Nelson’s avenger, when he shot the French sailor who killed the famous admiral. Pollard served as Mishipman in the navy, and later became a commander, and he may have been the reason that Nelson paid a visit to Kingsand and dined at a local inn.

The pair served together at the Battle of Trafalgar, and although the exact details of the event remain unclear, it’s believed that Pollard’s claims of avenging Nelson’s death were true.

Cawsand Fort

A piece of Cawsand history is still visible perched just above the little village. Cawsand Fort occupies the site once used by a 17179 battery and is a Royal Commission of the Defence of the United Kingdom dating back to the 1860s.

The fort was finally released by the Ministry of Defence in 1926, and lay unused for many years before being transformed into accommodation. The Rame Peninsula has more than its share of forts dating back to the 16 century.

Smuggling Days

Like so many villages on the south coast of Cornwall, the Kingsand and Cawsand history books have their share of chapters on smuggling. What better spot to smuggle illegal wares onto the shore than a quiet area known as ‘Cornwall’s forgotten corner?’ Cawsand, in particular was a favourite for unloading contraband, and the foreboding naval presence just around the corner in Plymouth was not enough to deter the smugglers!

More than 50 smuggling vessels were operating to and from Cawsand by the year 1815, and some amazing smuggler’s tunnels have been discovered around its shores, although they are now sealed.

Rame Head Chapel

Rame Head is a dramatic point on the east Cornwall coast, and it’s a significant one to the history of Kingsand and Cawsand. Findings on Rame Head point to life in this area as far back as the Mesolithic period. The Rame Head Chapel was built in medieval times and was dedicated to Saint Michael the Archangel.

There are records showing the granting of a licence for mass on the site in 1425, and much of the structure remains today. Throughout the fifteenth century a watchman was posted on the site, and would light a beacon in the event that vessels were spotted offshore. Rame Head is found within the Mount Edgecumbe Country Park.

Tucked in ‘Cornwall’s forgotten corner’, the whitewashed fishing villages of Kingsand and Cawsand lie on the peaceful Rame Peninsula. In spite of their picturesque whitewashed cottages and sloping streets the twin villages are home to some surprising historical secrets! Kingsand and Cawsand holiday cottages are surrounded by history, so have fun stepping into it...

The Ancient Border

Kingsand and Cawsand may look tranquil and unassuming, but Kingsand and Cawsand’s history is actually entwined with two counties! Kingsand was in Devon until 1844, and the Cornwall and Devon border ran right between the two villages.

The ancient border has since been officially moved, but if you look closely you can still find the original painted sign on the border cottage, a house named Devon Corn. How many chances do you get to stand in what was once Cornwall and Devon at the same time?!

John Pollarn RN

A former resident also made the Kingsand and Cawsand history books, John Pollard RN made his name as Nelson’s avenger, when he shot the French sailor who killed the famous admiral. Pollard served as Mishipman in the navy, and later became a commander, and he may have been the reason that Nelson paid a visit to Kingsand and dined at a local inn.

The pair served together at the Battle of Trafalgar, and although the exact details of the event remain unclear, it’s believed that Pollard’s claims of avenging Nelson’s death were true.

Cawsand Fort

A piece of Cawsand history is still visible perched just above the little village. Cawsand Fort occupies the site once used by a 17179 battery and is a Royal Commission of the Defence of the United Kingdom dating back to the 1860s.

The fort was finally released by the Ministry of Defence in 1926, and lay unused for many years before being transformed into accommodation. The Rame Peninsula has more than its share of forts dating back to the 16 century.

Smuggling Days

Like so many villages on the south coast of Cornwall, the Kingsand and Cawsand history books have their share of chapters on smuggling. What better spot to smuggle illegal wares onto the shore than a quiet area known as ‘Cornwall’s forgotten corner?’ Cawsand, in particular was a favourite for unloading contraband, and the foreboding naval presence just around the corner in Plymouth was not enough to deter the smugglers!

More than 50 smuggling vessels were operating to and from Cawsand by the year 1815, and some amazing smuggler’s tunnels have been discovered around its shores, although they are now sealed.

Rame Head Chapel

Rame Head is a dramatic point on the east Cornwall coast, and it’s a significant one to the history of Kingsand and Cawsand. Findings on Rame Head point to life in this area as far back as the Mesolithic period. The Rame Head Chapel was built in medieval times and was dedicated to Saint Michael the Archangel.

There are records showing the granting of a licence for mass on the site in 1425, and much of the structure remains today. Throughout the fifteenth century a watchman was posted on the site, and would light a beacon in the event that vessels were spotted offshore. Rame Head is found within the Mount Edgecumbe Country Park.

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