History of Wells

History of Wells

Description

One of the nicest things about a stay in a Wells holiday cottage if the fascinating history that surrounds them. From the sweeping architecture of the cathedral, to the prehistoric caves of Wookey Hole, Wells has been inhabited by man since prehistoric times. And ever wondered how it got its name? Read on...

Wookey Hole Caves

Wookey Hole Caves represent the more natural history of Wells. Dating back millions (yes, millions!) of years, the caves have housed residents of the area for 50,000 years! Ancient men found the caves a safe haven from the elements and wild animals, and they remain a steady temperature of 11 degrees Celsius.

Evidence of life has been dated back to the Tropical and Ice Age eras, and there are even remains of a Hyena Den. In fact, a pack of hyenas drove early man over a cliff edge and consumed them at its foot!

The Monmouth Rebellion

The Monmouth Rebellion in 1685 played its role in the history of Wells too, in fact, it even unfolded within the cathedral! As the West Country tried to overthrown the monarch James II, James Scott, the 1 Duke of Monmouth launched an ill-fated plan to claim the throne.

The Monmouth Rebellion saw Wells hurled into its centre when an uprising took place in the city, and lead from the cathedral’s roof was used by rebels to create shot. The cathedral was even used as a stable.

Why Wells

The city of Wells gets its name from the three wells that lie beneath it. Two of the original wells are found within the grounds of the historic Bishop’s Palace, and one is found within the city’s market square. The people of the Middle Ages believed the wells to hold magical and curative powers.

The springs are fed from the Wookey Holes caves, so they never fail to run. Although the source of the wells is now known, they have lost little of their intriguing appeal, so make sure you catch a glimpse of one during a stay in the city.

Wells Cathedral

The most awe-inspiring reminder of the history of Wells is its dazzling cathedral, which continues to welcome visitors and the faithful daily. Work began on the cathedral we see today in around 1175, and it became the first cathedral in England to adopt the (then new) Gothic style.

The first step of the building took around 80 years to complete and was constructed from east to west. Bishop’s Close was built in 1348, and remains the only intact Medieval street in Europe! In 1703, a Great Storm not only killed Bishop Kidder, but the force of it also smashed part of the nave’s West Window.

One of the nicest things about a stay in a Wells holiday cottage if the fascinating history that surrounds them. From the sweeping architecture of the cathedral, to the prehistoric caves of Wookey Hole, Wells has been inhabited by man since prehistoric times. And ever wondered how it got its name? Read on...

Wookey Hole Caves

Wookey Hole Caves represent the more natural history of Wells. Dating back millions (yes, millions!) of years, the caves have housed residents of the area for 50,000 years! Ancient men found the caves a safe haven from the elements and wild animals, and they remain a steady temperature of 11 degrees Celsius.

Evidence of life has been dated back to the Tropical and Ice Age eras, and there are even remains of a Hyena Den. In fact, a pack of hyenas drove early man over a cliff edge and consumed them at its foot!

The Monmouth Rebellion

The Monmouth Rebellion in 1685 played its role in the history of Wells too, in fact, it even unfolded within the cathedral! As the West Country tried to overthrown the monarch James II, James Scott, the 1 Duke of Monmouth launched an ill-fated plan to claim the throne.

The Monmouth Rebellion saw Wells hurled into its centre when an uprising took place in the city, and lead from the cathedral’s roof was used by rebels to create shot. The cathedral was even used as a stable.

Why Wells

The city of Wells gets its name from the three wells that lie beneath it. Two of the original wells are found within the grounds of the historic Bishop’s Palace, and one is found within the city’s market square. The people of the Middle Ages believed the wells to hold magical and curative powers.

The springs are fed from the Wookey Holes caves, so they never fail to run. Although the source of the wells is now known, they have lost little of their intriguing appeal, so make sure you catch a glimpse of one during a stay in the city.

Wells Cathedral

The most awe-inspiring reminder of the history of Wells is its dazzling cathedral, which continues to welcome visitors and the faithful daily. Work began on the cathedral we see today in around 1175, and it became the first cathedral in England to adopt the (then new) Gothic style.

The first step of the building took around 80 years to complete and was constructed from east to west. Bishop’s Close was built in 1348, and remains the only intact Medieval street in Europe! In 1703, a Great Storm not only killed Bishop Kidder, but the force of it also smashed part of the nave’s West Window.

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