History of the Isle of Purbeck

History of the Isle of Purbeck

Description

The history surrounding our Isle of Purbeck holiday cottages is myterius, dramatic and best of all – visible throughout the region. We’ve got ruined castles, deserted villages and an adventurer’s end, all on the beautiful Purbeck Peninsula.

Corfe Castle

It’s impossible to miss this striking reminder of Purbeck history, as its ruin looms dramatically above the peaceful countryside of the Isle of Purbeck. Corfe Castle dates back almost a thousand years, and although largely demolished in 1646 the ruin is still a fascinating chance to step back in time.

Enid Blyton secured the castle into more recent history too, using it as inspiration for Kirrin Castle in her book ‘Five on a Treasure Island’. Corfe Castle was once the gateway to the Purbeck Hills, and its tales of royalty, battle and the surrounding nature continue to lure visitors in their droves.

Lulworth Estate

Built in the early part of the 17 century, Lulworth Castle sits in its very own grounds and is a beautiful example of the history of Purbeck. The castle was originally intended as a hunting lodge, and the Chapel of St Marys in the same grounds is one of the best examples of architecture found in Dorset.

The famous Durdle Door and beautiful Lulworth Cove are also found on the Lulworth Estate, so it’s a must for any list of things to see on the Isle of Purbeck. Lulworth Cove is known for its perfectly formed, round bay, and Durdle Door is one of the county’s best-known landmarks.

Tyneham

The village of Tyneham was evacuated in December of 1943 fro WW2 military training, and it’s been empty ever since. Known as the village that time forgot, Tyneham is almost as it was left – offering an eerie glimpse into the history of Purbeck and its role in the war efforts.

Many of the original buildings still stand, and the church is still used for service on occasion.

The school is home to fascinating exhibitions about Tyneham and its former villagers, and it’s also a great starting point for walks and the South West Coast Path.

Lawrence of Arabia

The unassuming village of Moreton was etched into the Purbeck history books by its connections to Lawrence of Arabia. T.E. Lawrence’s cousins owned Moreton Estate, and he enlisted as a private in the tank corps at nearby Bovington after returning from his adventures.

Unfortunately, Lawrence’s life was cut short in the village when he was involved in a sudden motorcycle accident, and he is buried in the local churchyard. The cottage in which he lived at nearby Clouds Hill is now home to an exhibition of the amazing life of T.E.Lawrence.

The history surrounding our Isle of Purbeck holiday cottages is myterius, dramatic and best of all – visible throughout the region. We’ve got ruined castles, deserted villages and an adventurer’s end, all on the beautiful Purbeck Peninsula.

Corfe Castle

It’s impossible to miss this striking reminder of Purbeck history, as its ruin looms dramatically above the peaceful countryside of the Isle of Purbeck. Corfe Castle dates back almost a thousand years, and although largely demolished in 1646 the ruin is still a fascinating chance to step back in time.

Enid Blyton secured the castle into more recent history too, using it as inspiration for Kirrin Castle in her book ‘Five on a Treasure Island’. Corfe Castle was once the gateway to the Purbeck Hills, and its tales of royalty, battle and the surrounding nature continue to lure visitors in their droves.

Lulworth Estate

Built in the early part of the 17 century, Lulworth Castle sits in its very own grounds and is a beautiful example of the history of Purbeck. The castle was originally intended as a hunting lodge, and the Chapel of St Marys in the same grounds is one of the best examples of architecture found in Dorset.

The famous Durdle Door and beautiful Lulworth Cove are also found on the Lulworth Estate, so it’s a must for any list of things to see on the Isle of Purbeck. Lulworth Cove is known for its perfectly formed, round bay, and Durdle Door is one of the county’s best-known landmarks.

Tyneham

The village of Tyneham was evacuated in December of 1943 fro WW2 military training, and it’s been empty ever since. Known as the village that time forgot, Tyneham is almost as it was left – offering an eerie glimpse into the history of Purbeck and its role in the war efforts.

Many of the original buildings still stand, and the church is still used for service on occasion.

The school is home to fascinating exhibitions about Tyneham and its former villagers, and it’s also a great starting point for walks and the South West Coast Path.

Lawrence of Arabia

The unassuming village of Moreton was etched into the Purbeck history books by its connections to Lawrence of Arabia. T.E. Lawrence’s cousins owned Moreton Estate, and he enlisted as a private in the tank corps at nearby Bovington after returning from his adventures.

Unfortunately, Lawrence’s life was cut short in the village when he was involved in a sudden motorcycle accident, and he is buried in the local churchyard. The cottage in which he lived at nearby Clouds Hill is now home to an exhibition of the amazing life of T.E.Lawrence.

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