History of Clovelly

History of Clovelly

Description

Visitors with a passion for history will be in their element in Hartland and Clovelly holiday cottages! The private estate of Clovelly fishing village was acquired by the Hamlyn family back in 1738 and it remains in the family to this day. Clovelly’s history is all the more fascinating because efforts are made to preserve it, the village remains unchanged, making it that much easier to imagine days gone by.

The Fisherman's Cottage

What better insight into the history of Clovelly than to visit an original fishermam’s cottage? The Fisherman’s Cottage dates back to the 1930s and is a priceless view of life at the time. The original covered well can still be seen, and exposed cottage walls demonstrate the construction of the houses.

Also, realistic decor and furniture bring the home to life and make this a touching and fascinating insight into Clovelly’s history.

Lifeboat Station

Clovelly’s original lifeboat station was constructed after a terrible storm in 1870, and the first lifeboat to serve the village had a crew of 15 and 10 oars. Due to difficulty leaving and entering Clovelly’s harbour during rough seas, the village was a permanent home to its two RNLI lifeboats and their crews.

The lifeboat was manned at all times and sailed out to Lundy Island when bad weather set in.When the permanent lifeboat was taken away, villagers strove to supply their own lifeboat service and the RNLI returned to serve the village 8 years later. Today, it operates from an enhanced boatshed and continues to guard the harbour and surrounding waters.

The Look-Out

The Look-Out is one of Clovelly’s most popular spots and has always had a special place in the lives of the villagers. The Look-Out is one of the best vantage points out to sea in Clovelly, and visitors to the village head to the spot to make the most of its beautiful views and peaceful surroundings.

However, the views were not always used for such relaxed pastimes. The views stretch as far as Exmoor, and lucky visitors even spot the occasional Falcon! In days gone by, the wives and families of Clovelly fishermen would gather at the Look-Out to watch nervously for the safe return of their loved ones.

Crazy Kate's Cottage

For all its beauty, it’s difficult to imaging the tragic past of Clovelly’s oldest cottage, known as Crazy Kate’s Cottage. The cottage is named after the widow of a Clovelly fisherman, named Kate Lyall.

The cottage has some of the best views out to Clovelly’s fishing harbour, and Kate would sit in the upper window of the cottage and watch her husband fishing in the bay. Sadly, Mr Lyall was killed when a squall exploded in the harbour and drowned him as Kate watched from the cottage. Kate never recovered from the tragedy and eventually walked into the sea wearing her wedding dress to rest with her ill-fated husband.

The Kingsley Museum

One of the most important figures in Clovelly’s history is Charles Kingsley, former resident and 19 century author of famous novels such as the popular children’s classic ‘The Water Babies’ and ‘Westward Ho!’.

In fact, Kingsley was inspired to write ‘The Water babies’ when he returned to Clovelly as an adult, and his cottage is now the Kingsley Museum. One of Kingsley’s most famous poems is named ‘The Three Fishers’ and demonstrates his understanding of the darker side of life in Clovelly, as it describes the struggles faced by local fishermen’s families.

Visitors with a passion for history will be in their element in Hartland and Clovelly holiday cottages! The private estate of Clovelly fishing village was acquired by the Hamlyn family back in 1738 and it remains in the family to this day. Clovelly’s history is all the more fascinating because efforts are made to preserve it, the village remains unchanged, making it that much easier to imagine days gone by.

The Fisherman's Cottage

What better insight into the history of Clovelly than to visit an original fishermam’s cottage? The Fisherman’s Cottage dates back to the 1930s and is a priceless view of life at the time. The original covered well can still be seen, and exposed cottage walls demonstrate the construction of the houses.

Also, realistic decor and furniture bring the home to life and make this a touching and fascinating insight into Clovelly’s history.

Lifeboat Station

Clovelly’s original lifeboat station was constructed after a terrible storm in 1870, and the first lifeboat to serve the village had a crew of 15 and 10 oars. Due to difficulty leaving and entering Clovelly’s harbour during rough seas, the village was a permanent home to its two RNLI lifeboats and their crews.

The lifeboat was manned at all times and sailed out to Lundy Island when bad weather set in.When the permanent lifeboat was taken away, villagers strove to supply their own lifeboat service and the RNLI returned to serve the village 8 years later. Today, it operates from an enhanced boatshed and continues to guard the harbour and surrounding waters.

The Look-Out

The Look-Out is one of Clovelly’s most popular spots and has always had a special place in the lives of the villagers. The Look-Out is one of the best vantage points out to sea in Clovelly, and visitors to the village head to the spot to make the most of its beautiful views and peaceful surroundings.

However, the views were not always used for such relaxed pastimes. The views stretch as far as Exmoor, and lucky visitors even spot the occasional Falcon! In days gone by, the wives and families of Clovelly fishermen would gather at the Look-Out to watch nervously for the safe return of their loved ones.

Crazy Kate's Cottage

For all its beauty, it’s difficult to imaging the tragic past of Clovelly’s oldest cottage, known as Crazy Kate’s Cottage. The cottage is named after the widow of a Clovelly fisherman, named Kate Lyall.

The cottage has some of the best views out to Clovelly’s fishing harbour, and Kate would sit in the upper window of the cottage and watch her husband fishing in the bay. Sadly, Mr Lyall was killed when a squall exploded in the harbour and drowned him as Kate watched from the cottage. Kate never recovered from the tragedy and eventually walked into the sea wearing her wedding dress to rest with her ill-fated husband.

The Kingsley Museum

One of the most important figures in Clovelly’s history is Charles Kingsley, former resident and 19 century author of famous novels such as the popular children’s classic ‘The Water Babies’ and ‘Westward Ho!’.

In fact, Kingsley was inspired to write ‘The Water babies’ when he returned to Clovelly as an adult, and his cottage is now the Kingsley Museum. One of Kingsley’s most famous poems is named ‘The Three Fishers’ and demonstrates his understanding of the darker side of life in Clovelly, as it describes the struggles faced by local fishermen’s families.

0
Email Sent

Send an email

A password reset message will be sent to your e-mail address.